Category Archives: Elinor

What indeed?

“’What have wealth or grandeur to do with happiness?’” [Marianne] ‘Grandeur has but little,’ said Elinor, ‘but wealth has much to do with it.’ ‘Elinor, for shame!’ said Marianne; ‘money can only give happiness where there is nothing else to … Continue reading

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Filed under Competence, Elinor, Happiness, Marianne, Money, Sense and Sensibility, Wealth

Isolation and grief

"I have had all this hanging on my mind, without being at liberty to speak of it to a single creature . . ." Elinor Dashwood, Sense and Sensibility, v. 3, ch. 1

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Filed under Elinor, Heartbreak, Self-command, Sense and Sensibility

Self-knowledge (or not)

Such behaviour as this, so exactly the reverse of her own, appeared no more meritorious to Marianne, than her own had seemed faulty to her. Sense and Sensibility, v. 1, ch. 19

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Filed under Elinor, Marianne, Self-command, Sense and Sensibility, Sense vs. Sensibility

Waiting…

She would have been glad to know when these difficulties were to cease, this opposition was to yield . . . Sense and Sensibility, v. 1, ch. 19 Elinor waiting for Mrs. Ferrars to give Edward his freedom

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Filed under Elinor, Sense and Sensibility, Uncertainty in love

Other points

“But there are other points to be considered besides his inclination.” Sense and Sensibility, v. 1, ch. 4 (. . . Like his horrible mother.)  More of sensible Elinor

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Filed under Elinor, Love, Sense and Sensibility, Sense vs. Sensibility, Uncertainty in love

By no means

“I am by no means assured of his regard for me.” Elinor, re: Edward Sense and Sensibility, v. 1, ch. 4 Elinor favors truth over imagination.

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Filed under Elinor, Sense and Sensibility, Uncertainty in love

Quiet children

[Lucy Steele] " . . . for my part, I love to see children full of life and spirits; I cannot bear them if they are tame and quiet." "I confess," replied Elinor, "that while I am at Barton Park, … Continue reading

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Filed under Children, Elinor, Lucy Steele, Sarcasm, Sense and Sensibility

Polite lies

Marianne was silent; it was impossible for her to say what she did not feel, however trivial the occasion; and upon Elinor therefore the whole task of telling lies when politeness required it, always fell. Sense and Sensibility, volume 1, … Continue reading

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Filed under Elinor, Marianne, On being a lady, Sense and Sensibility, Sense vs. Sensibility

Some kind of sense (but not much)

Elinor soon allowed them credit for some kind of sense . . . Sense and Sensibility, volume 1, chapter 21 Of the Miss Steeles  

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Filed under Elinor, Lucy Steele, On being a lady, Sense and Sensibility

The sweetest girls in the world

Sir John . . . set off directly for the cottage to tell the Miss Dashwoods of the Miss Steeles’ arrival, and to assure them of their being the sweetest girls in the world. From such commendation as this, however, … Continue reading

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Filed under Elinor, Hyperbole, Lucy Steele, On being a lady, Sense and Sensibility, Sir John Middleton