Category Archives: Edward Ferrars

The idle rich

". . . there was no necessity for my having any profession at all . . ." Edward Ferrars Sense and Sensibility, v. 1, ch. 19

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Filed under Edward Ferrars, Money, Sense and Sensibility, Wealth, Youth

Finding a calling

“We never could agree in our choice of a profession. I always preferred the church, as I still do. But that was not smart enough for my family. They recommended the army. That was a great deal too smart for … Continue reading

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Filed under Edward Ferrars, Family, Power, Sense and Sensibility

The first smart of the heavy blow

Supported by the conviction of having done nothing to merit her present unhappiness, and consoled by the belief that Edward had done nothing to forfeit her esteem, she thought she could even now, under the first smart of the heavy … Continue reading

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Filed under Edward Ferrars, Elinor, Heartbreak, Marianne, Self-command, Sense and Sensibility

Elinor weeps

. . . she wept for him, more than for herself. Sense and Sensibility, volume 2, chapter 1 Of Elinor, on learning of Edward's engagement

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Filed under Edward Ferrars, Elinor, Heartbreak, Sense and Sensibility

Advantageous idleness

” . . . as I might be as dashing and expensive without a red coat on my back as with one, idleness was pronounced on the whole to be most advantageous and honourable . . . ” Sense and … Continue reading

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Filed under Edward Ferrars, Men, Sense and Sensibility, Youth

Properly idle

” . . . a young man of eighteen is not in general so earnestly bent on being busy as to resist the solicitations of his friends to do nothing.” Sense and Sensibility, volume 1, chapter 19 Spoken by Edward … Continue reading

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Filed under Edward Ferrars, Men, Youth

Know your own happiness

“‘You are in a melancholy humour and fancy that anyone unlike yourself must be happy.  But remember that the pain of parting from friends will be felt by everybody at times, whatever be their education or state.  Know your own … Continue reading

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Filed under Edward Ferrars, Happiness, Mrs. Dashwood, Sense and Sensibility

Marianne’s opinion of Edward

“I think him everything that is worthy and amiable.” Sense and Sensibility, volume 1, chapter 4 Marianne did not know how much she would come to prize “worthy and amiable” over romantic and good-looking.

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Filed under Edward Ferrars, Marianne, Men, Sense and Sensibility

A simple man

“‘I have no wish to be distinguished; and I have every reason to hope I never shall.  Thank Heaven!  I cannot be forced into genius and eloquence.” Edward Ferrars on his mother’s hopes for his fame, however it might be … Continue reading

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Filed under Edward Ferrars, Men, Sense and Sensibility