Pictures of perfection

I love this quote!  Austen is writing to her niece, Fanny.  Fanny had forced one of her suitors to read her Aunt Jane’s books without telling him who the author was (she wrote them anonymously, and the books only said, “By a Lady”).  He, apparently, thought that the young ladies in her stories should have been better behaved.  So Austen replies, “Pictures of perfection, as you know, make me sick and wicked.”  Which is one of the things I love about her stories.  She also told Fanny to fess up to her suitor and not to force him to read any more of her books.

Read more of my thoughts on Darcy’s imperfections over at Darcyholic Diversions.

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Filed under Austen family, Character, Letters, niece Fanny Knight, Writing

With such an husband…

Referring of course to Lydia and Wickham, in Pride and Prejudice.

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Filed under Images, Lydia Bennet, Marriage, Pride and Prejudice, Wickham

Money & happiness

Marianne to Elinor

Sense and Sensibility, Vol 1, Ch 17

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Filed under Happiness, Marianne, Money, Sense and Sensibility, Wealth

Handsome…

Handsome is as handsome does.

Thought it would be fun to lighten things up with some images here.  (And wanted to try out the new Pinterest buttons I added. Join me over there!)

To be fair, this is not a saying Jane Austen came up with, but one that was in use already, and one she used jokingly in a letter to her sister about their neighbor, James Digweed.

Read about Finding a Good Man (and more) in The Jane Austen Guide to Life.

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Filed under Darcy, Images, Letters, Matthew Macfadyen, Men, On being a gentleman

Such amiable appearance

. . . it was not in her nature to question the veracity of a young man of such amiable appearance as Wickham.

Of Jane Bennet

Pride and Prejudice, Vol. 1, Ch. 17

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Filed under Character, Jane Bennet, Pride and Prejudice, Wickham

Whatever he said . . .

Whatever he said, was said well; and whatever he did, done gracefully. Elizabeth went away with her head full of him.

Of Wickham

Pride and Prejudice, Vol. 1, Ch. 16

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Filed under Elizabeth Bennet, Love, On being a gentleman, Pride and Prejudice, Wickham

Lady Catherine

“She has the reputation of being remarkably sensible and clever; but I rather believe she derives part of her abilities from her rank and fortune, part from her authoritative manner, and the rest from the pride of her nephew, who chuses that every one connected with him should have an understanding of the first class.”

Wickham to Elizabeth, about Lady Catherine

Pride and Prejudice, Vol. 1, Ch. 16

 

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Filed under Lady Catherine, Money, Power, Pride and Prejudice, Wealth, Wickham

He does not want abilities

“Mr. Darcy can please where he chuses. He does not want abilities. He can be a conversible companion if he thinks it worth his while. Among those who are at all his equals in consequence, he is a very different man from what he is to the less prosperous. His pride never deserts him; but with the rich, he is liberal-minded, just, sincere, rational, honourable, and perhaps agreeable, — allowing something for fortune and figure.”

Mr. Wickham to Elizabeth

Pride and Prejudice, Vol. 1, Ch. 16

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Filed under Darcy, Money, Poverty, Power, Pride, Pride and Prejudice, Wealth, Wickham

Comments turned off

After 79 spam comments in the last week (and few “real” comments), I’ve turned off comments here.  Always feel free to email me!

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Pride, his best friend

“I wonder that the very pride of this Mr. Darcy has not made him just to you! — If from no better motive, that he should not have been too proud to be dishonest, — for dishonesty I must call it.”

“It is wonderful,” — replied Wickham, — “for almost all his actions may be traced to pride; — and pride has often been his best friend. It has connected him nearer with virtue than any other feeling. But we are none of us consistent; and in his behaviour to me, there were stronger impulses even than pride.”

“Can such abominable pride as his, have ever done him good?”

“Yes. It has often led him to be liberal and generous, — to give his money freely, to display hospitality, to assist his tenants, and relieve the poor. Family pride, and filial pride, for he is very proud of what his father was, have done this. Not to appear to disgrace his family, to degenerate from the popular qualities, or lose the influence of the Pemberley House, is a powerful motive.”

Elizabeth and Wickham, at her Aunt Phillips’ house

Pride and Prejudice, Vol. 1, Ch. 16

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Filed under Darcy, Elizabeth Bennet, Generosity, Money, Poverty, Power, Pride, Pride and Prejudice, Wealth, Wickham